DEAN GREEN TEAM

Wildlife Conservation Group in the

Forest of Dean

Gloucestershire

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Pale Tussock Moth Caterpillar ( Calliteara pudibunda)

Found in forest, parks, and gardens between July and October, these caterpillars enjoy munching the leaves of Oak, Birch, and Lime trees.

28 October 2008

The Japanese Larch is just falling which was a relief as the chain saw had got stuck in it and had to be released first!

The larch is one of the commonest conifers to be planted in the UK. There are ten species world wide of which two species have been introduced into Britain on a large scale, the Japanese Larch (Larix kaempferi) and the European Larch (Larix decidua). The Japanese Larch has been extensively planted in forests whilst the European Larch is mainly to be seen in woodlands of perhaps over 60 years of age and in parks and gardens.

 

Milkwall

Grid Ref SO588087

The day started out with brilliant autumn sunshine and the most glorious colouring on the trees but it soon turned into pouring rain! We were clearing a glade which we had started last year and we were joined by two local residents who are very keen on the wildlife in these woods. They said that the clearings we made last year had provided a profusion of violets and many butterflies - it is good to know when our work has been successful!

Most of the trees we cleared were dead from squirrel damage except for a large Japanese Larch

 

Larch felling

 

Bonfire

The fallen larch provided us with the perfect spot for a break!

 

Adder

 

Pale Tussock Moth Caterpillar

Adder (Vipera berus)

This photograph was taken in April at the site at Milkwall.

Adders are relatively common in areas of rough, open countryside and are often associated with woodland edge habitats. They are less inclined to disappear into the surrounding undergrowth when disturbed and so are probably the most frequently seen of the three British snakes. The best time to see them is in early spring when they emerge from their hibernation dens. By mid April, the males have shed their dull winter skin and are ready to mate.

 

 

 

 

 

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